Final Ad Campaign!!

megan-keogh-campaign.pdf

After a week of long nights alone with the pen tool, I present to… my ad campaign. (Click the blue link above for PDF of all three) My client for this ad campaign is Ontario Provincial Parks. They have over 300 beautiful parks across Ontario however the number of tent campers continues to drop. Parks predict that this is because less and less of the younger generations have grown up with camping, which leads to my target audience.

My primary target audience is young men and women from ages 18-30. I think that this is the age frame in which one can travel on their own or with friends and desires great adventure. Young adults fresh out of school for example may not have the money to travel far and/or the knowledge that they don’t necessarily need to leave the province in order to cure their wanderlust.

To reach my target audience I chose to advertise in Canada’s best travel magazine Outpost. This magazine is based out of Toronto with a focus on down-to-earth experiences and sharing their knowledge and experience of travelling with readers. Outpost magazine offers a print or web subscription; appealing to my tech-crazy target audience and is also free in a lot of outdoor stores like Mountain Equipment Co-op and Sail. I chose to advertise using a reveal ad because the likely-hood of a young adult obtaining this magazine 3 months in a row is somewhat low. I think that instead, showcasing Ontario parks three pages in a row will increase the chances of them seeing my advertisement as they have 3 chances to catch it while skimming through the magazine as they’re waiting in line. The ads will be in the order shown, so that the figure progressively gets further away, disappearing into the distance – getting lost within nature.

My design strategy was to showcase the Ontario Parks in a way that quickly catches the reader and encourages them to consider camping there. Geometric patterns are undeniably popular in today’s culture; you can see these triangular patterns on clothes, phone cases, etc. and I plan on using this trend to my advantage. My target audience recognizes this design immediately and registers it as something new, clean, fresh, modern, and exciting. I chose three Ontario Provincial Parks that I think boast spectacular views and redrew them using a geometric design. The colours and layout of the landscape are taken from the source photographs, keeping the park true but showing it in a new light.

All three ads include the slogan “Get Lost”. I think this text will successfully catch the viewer’s attention as we typically read this saying as negative or insulting. I chose a simple block font for the word “get” and kerned the e and t into a ligature in order to minimalize the gap and for a smoother aesthetic. The “lost” is in a loose brush script in order to contrast the harsh angles of the designs, helping it to stand out. The colours and design hold the viewer long enough to build interest and desire, which leads to action. We read top to bottom, so by the time they reach the bottom of the page they will hopefully want more information. At the bottom of the page is the name of the park location and the Ontario Parks website. I used a clean sans serif font for this so that the information is easily legible, and not too ornate that it gets lost in the already very busy scenery. The Ontario Parks logo in the bottom right is directly above where the viewer’s thumb would be; the client is the showcase and therefor should be the last thing they see before flipping the page.

As I said before, the colours are all from the original photographs, with the exception of the red. I chose to repeat the colour in all three ads in order to create another connection between the ads. Red is the complimentary colour to green (which is consistently throughout all ads) so it seemed like the natural choice for grabbing the viewer’s attention. Showcased in the top right slogan and then on the canoe, shirt, or bike; it brings the viewer’s eyes down and into the design.

In order to achieve all of the above, I used the Illustrator pen and eyedropper tool to create the shapes and represent the colours. Each shape is individually drawn based on shadows, colours, and forms. The typography executed by editing the text outlines stretching and scaling the swash on the L and creating ligatures on the GET. It was a challenge making sure each shape touched another so that I could avoid gaps, and representing soft figures with such harsh lines.

I think my campaign is successful in catching the viewer’s eye with a new perspective. The “Get Lost” slogan places a humorous tone in these advertisements, something that I think Ontario Parks could definitely use a little bit of if they want to gain admissions. I think it would be a catchy motto for Ontario Parks to use on some of their products or advertisements and the geometric pattern could also be a feature to carry over. This design could give my client a much-needed modern update, grabbing the attention of young people as they always gravitate to the new. The geometric pattern in my advertisements successfully reflects modern day design and will produce a lot of new customers for Ontario Provincial Parks.

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3 thoughts on “Final Ad Campaign!!

  1. Megan, you’ve done an excellent job executing your concept. I was impressed by your effort with rendering your photographs into polygon textures via the pen tool. You have a keen eye for layout and colour theory, which have been displayed successfully through this assignment. Your pairing of contrasting typefaces also works ell with your concept and marry’s the theme of “Get Lost” very well. My only suggestions would be to improve the readability in the call-to-action a bit further. In some cases it reads clearly but it’s hard to read when the type is overtop of a lighter background. Adding a text shadow or slightly darker background behind the type might help. Also, since your photograph of the cyclist is now a vector, could you maybe bring the subject closer to the foreground and enlarge the man on the bicycle? He seems a bit far in comparison to the other two subjects in your other ads, which makes it hard to notice among the foliage.

    Other than that, this is a great piece to publish in your portfolio. Great job!

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